Refereeing

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Squash Rules

Squash 57 (Racketball) Rules

Let, Stroke or No Let?

Consideration Decision Rule
Did interference occur? NO right NO LET 12.7.1
YES
down
       
Was the interference minimal? YES right NO LET 12.7.1
NO
down
       
Could the obstructed player have got to the ball and made a good return and was that player making every effort to do so? NO right NO LET 12.7.2
YES
down
       
Did the obstructed player move past the point of interference and play on? YES right NO LET 12.7.3
NO
down
       
Did the obstructed player create the interference in moving to the ball? YES right NO LET 12.7.4
NO
down
       
Did the opponent make every effort to avoid interference? NO right STROKE to player 12.8.1
YES
down
       
Did the interference prevent the player's reasonable swing? YES right STROKE to player 12.8.2
NO
down
       
Could the obstructed player have made a winning return? YES right STROKE to player 12.8.3
NO
down
       
Would the obstructed player have struck the opponent with the ball going directly to the front wall or if going to a side wall would it have been a winning return? YES right STROKE to player 12.8.4
  NO right YES LET 12.9

 

Club Referee

Mark WinderMark Winder, England Squash & Racketball referee

The story, so far. I became an England Squash & Racketball referee in March 2010, when I marked a match in a European Master's event at The Park, Nottingham.

The match was an over 45 men's match, the balcony had cleared, as no one fancied marking, I found out why! After an extremely competitive, bad tempered opening game, the match ended in the second, as one player walked off court in disgust at his opponent's attitude, and conceded the match. After the confusion had been sorted and temper's settled, I was still shaking a little, when England Squash Referee Instructor Joss Garvey approached me and said I had done reasonably well with a difficult match, would I think about becoming a referee. With Linda and Jess (my wife and daughter) both playing on the national circuit, I had marked quite a few games for them, as the winner has to mark the next game on the court they have played on, and I also knew of Joss through attending these event's.

Joss then invited me to attend a refereeing course she was tutoring at Penrith Rugby club on 25th April 2010 which I did, and then went on to pass the exam to become a provisional (now called club) referee some time later in May. I then refereed county league and club matches along with a few national events, until I was asked by International Referee Wendy Danzy, (tournament referee for the event) to step in to cover a non- appearance at the English Junior Championships at Colet's squash club, Surrey, in March 2011. I marked 13 matches over two days, two of these were Under 17 boy's matches that lasted over 60 minutes each, whilst being assessed by Wendy Danzy. I managed to achieve a pass for each match, I was then moved up to County Grade referee on the back of my performance over the weekend.

When you reach County Grade, England Squash contact you with invitations to referee at major events throughout the year, you reply stating your availability for the particular event concerned, and they inform you of venue, time and date etc., these competitions then become your portfolio of events refereed at, and are what your grading is assessed upon.

These are some of the events that I refereed at the since March 2011;

E S Regional Championships, Arden SC, Birmingham; Northern Squash Festival, Northern Club, Manchester; British Open Masters, Nottingham SRC, Nottingham; North West Regional Championships, Fairways Lodge, Manchester; Tecnifibre British Junior Championships, National Squash Centre, Sport City, Manchester; British Junior Open, Hallamshire, Abbeydale, and Fulwood squash clubs, Sheffield; English Junior Championships, Colet's club, Richmond, Surrey; Allam Humber Junior Open, Hull&East Riding SC, Hull University, Hull.

 The British Junior Open 2012 has been the hardest event I have refereed at, doing 28 matches over three days at three different venues. Concentration really drains you, and with 32 nationalities playing, the pronunciation of names can be as challenging as making decisions. The days start with a briefing at 08-30 from the Tournament Referee, who control and organises referees at each venue. The briefings usually consist of certain issues they would like us to watch out for, ie; be tough on racket abuse, bad language, and player dissent during the course of a match. One thing that is different at the BJO is illegal coaching during matches by coaches from overseas nations, as this is always done in their native tongue. The refs find it difficult to understand the language, so just have to go on instinct and be firm. Matches are then allocated to you for the next session, usually 3 or 4 matches at a time, with a day normally seeing you do three sessions. One evening I finished my last match (a five setter) at 21-45pm, you do not require a sleeping pill in the evening!

During these tournaments, Senior Referee Assessors pick matches that they think are going to be close, or are contested by more challenging players to mark, so that you will have plenty of decisions to make, then they ask you to referee these matches to assess your performance under pressure, they mark the same match the way they would normally, then you compare marking sheets at the conclusion of the match, where they point out mistakes and discuss what should have been the correct decision or course of action.

The most challenging match I have done so far was an Over 35 men's quarter-final at the British Open Masters between Matthew Crawley (Wales) and Richard Davies (Staffordshire). I was being assessed by World Squash assessor John Massarella, the match was a nasty, bad tempered (and not just at each other) very close tight match that ended 3-2 to Davies, lasting 77 minutes requiring me to adjudicate on 42 decisions. Following this I had a 30 minute feedback session with John Massarella and Wendy Danzy after the match, along with two A4 sheets of positives, and things to "work" on.

This season is now underway and I hope to gain more experience and knowledge, and then attain more successful assessments for me to progress to next level which is Tournament Grade Referee by summer 2013.